Eurasian wigeon (haapana, bläsand) adults with ducklings

Eurasian wigeon or more casually wigeon (haapana, bläsand) adults with ducklings are so cute dabbling ducks.

I met wigeons first time this summer while visiting in Porla, Lohja. The male is handsome on his breeding plumage and has a loud characteristic whiplash-like whistling call vii-u(rr). As usually in the bird wold the female in less colorful and does not whistle 😊, though she is very graceful, small duck.

Wigeon male in breeding plumage (17.6.2020) Porla Lohja Finland
Wigeon male in breeding plumage (17.6.2020)
Wigeon female has warm colors in her body (17.6.2020) Porla Lohja Finland
Wigeon female has warm colors in her body (17.6.2020)

Wigeon ducklings

OMG how cute little wigeon ducklings are. I published earlier a post Eurasian Wigeon (Haapana) chicks stretching in which you can see photos of wigeon babies stretching their legs. Some of my readers thought they were having yoga time, some called it wigeon ballet 😁.

These beauties are from the same brood as the ones in my stretching post.

Baby wigeon ❤️from the front (23.6.2020) Porla Lohja Finland
Baby wigeon ❤️from the front (23.6.2020)
Baby wigeon ❤️from the side (23.6.2020) Porla Lohja Finland
Baby wigeon ❤️ from the side (23.6.2020)

The brood I saw in Porla had 10 ducklings. Usually wigeon female lay 7-9 eggs in April-May and she incubates for 22-23 days.

Wigeon female with 10 ducklings Porla Lohja Finland
Wigeon female incubates eggs for 22-23 days (21.6.2020)

It seems to be that quite many ducklings are killed when they are small. Within two days (21-23.6.) two were missing, beginning of August I saw five juveniles.

Wigeon ducklings leave nest after hatching but remain in their brood with their mother
Wigeon ducklings leave nest after hatching but remain in their brood with their mother

Wigeon juveniles

It is difficult to say is this a female or male as it still looks like female wigeon. Young wigeons become independent in 40 to 45 days, when they reach the fledgling stage. They are ready to mate when they are 1-2 years old.

Wigeon juvenile become indecent in 40-45 days Porla Lohja Finland
Juvenile wigeon learns to fly about 6 weeks after hatching (3.8.2020)
Wigeon females and juveniles are more uniformly reddish brown in coloring Porla Lohja Finland
Wigeon females and juveniles are more uniformly reddish brown in coloring (3.8.2020)

Eurasian wigeons (Anas penelope) breed from Iceland across northern Europe and Asia. Although most populations migrate and can be found from the British Isles to northern Africa and India in the winter, and a few even migrate to the United States and Canada.

Hopefully you find my wigeon post interesting and you liked my wigeon photos!

Minna from Finnish nature 😊

16 replies to “Eurasian wigeon (haapana, bläsand) adults with ducklings

  1. Yes! I like your pictures a lot. Baby birds are so precious. I am not near too much water so I don’t see baby waterfowl much, but I watching all the other fledglings feeding with their poor over worked mothers! In the fall I love to watch the flocks of ducks and geese swooping overhead as they fly South, though it makes me sad to see them go! My cat Willow was frightened of them when I first came here but now she knows it’s OK!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Yetismith! Baby birds are fluffy and round, I love them too. It is real sad to see birds leaving, soon they will start their journey towards South. Good that Willow is OK with migrating birds 😊 Geese make quite loud noice, so no wonder that Willow has been afraid.

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    1. Thank you Magikmermaid! I got to know wigeon this summer. The male in its plumage is beautiful and the whistling is so funny. The female is caring and she makes special sound when she wants to get the chicks near her. I love these birds and the chicks are so lovely 🙂

      Like

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